July 25, 2016: General Mills E. coli Outbreak Sickens Four More

four more individuals sicken by the E. coli Outbreak have been newly discovered according to A General Mills Press Release. General Mills has expanded its previously announced recall to include additional flour production dates.

FOOD POISONING LAWSUIT HELP

The personal injury lawyers at the Weinberg Law Firm have helped food poisoning victims nationwide receive compensation for their injuries and related damages. The Weinberg Law Firm is currently investigating cases related to the General Mills Flour E. coli Outbreak.

If you or a loved one has been injured after eating a contaminated food product, and you would like to know more about your legal rights, please call our lawyers at 1-877-934-6274 or fill out the Free Legal Case Evaluation Form found on this page.

General Mills Claims Nature of General Mills E. coli Outbreak is Unknown

The General Mills Press Release posits that the exact nature of this outbreak is unclear. A few possibilities listed include: perhaps there is a higher prevalence of E. coli in flour than normal, or the contamination is isolated to General Mills’ flour, or the contamination is across the flour industry, or perhaps the newer detection and genome sequencing tools are making a connection to flour that may have always existed at these levels.

Of the illness reported to health officials, none occurred in connection with flour that was properly baked, cooked or handled.

General Mills E. coli Outbreak Information

General Mills provided the following information:

“In order for severe E. coli illness to occur from flour, all three of the following things have to happen:

  • The flour a consumer is using has to contain the rare sub-types of E.coli that can make you sick.
  • The consumer has to eat raw dough, batter or other uncooked food made with the flour, or handle the raw dough and not wash their hands.
  • The consumer’s individual health characteristics will impact if they get sick and how severely. Some consumers have mild symptoms and others get very sick. It is not always known who will get sick and who will not.”

ABOUT E. COLI

Escherichia coli or E. coli is a type of bacterium that lives in the intestines of healthy humans and animals. Some strains of E. coli are capable of producing a powerful toxin, known as Shiga toxin, and can cause severe, life-threatening illness.

Symptoms of E. coli

According to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) symptoms of Shiga toxin-producing E. coli (STEC) infection include severe abdominal cramps, diarrhea, and vomiting. The diarrhea may become bloody and can lead to dehydration. There is usually little or no fever. The infection (and its symptoms) will vary from individual to individual, ranging from a mild to a life-threatening illness.

The CDC reports that symptoms of E. coli food poisoning typically begin 3-4 days after eating a contaminated food; however, symptoms may occur anywhere from 1 to 10 days following pathogen exposure.

July 23, 2016: Source of New Hamshire Beef E. coli Outbreak Remains Unknown

Twelve people have been sickened by contaminated ground beef in an E. coli outbreak based in New Hamshire.

OBTAIN A FREE E. COLI LAWSUIT EVALUATION

If you or a family member has suffered from food poisoning in the New Hamshire Beef E. coli Outbreak, and you have a question about your legal rights, you can request a free case evaluation from The Weinberg Law Firm by calling us toll free at 877-934-6274. Our phones are answered 24/7.

Unidentified Source of New Hamshire Beef E. coli Outbreak

Since those sickened consumed the contaminated beef at several different locations, the source of this beef contamination is not known.

While state health officials investigate the source of the E. coli, the state health department is reminding the public that public “the outbreak doesn’t pose a risk to people as long they’re making sure their food is properly prepared.”

How To Avoid E. coli Infection

“You’re gonna want to make sure that you cook ground beef to an internal temperature of 160 degrees Fahrenheit and that you validate that temperature by using a thermometer,” said Beth Daly, chief of the Bureau of Infectious Disease Control. “And then of course if you’re eating out in a restaurant, you don’t want to eat undercooked ground beef either, so you’re gonna want to order those hamburgers well done.”

About E. coli

Escherichia coli or E. coli is a type of bacterium that lives in the intestines of healthy humans and animals. While many strains of E. coli are harmless, some strains are capable of producing a powerful toxin, known as Shiga toxin, and can cause severe, life-threatening illness.

In their report on foodborne illnesses, The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) estimates that approximately 63,000 persons are infected with STEC O157:H7 and 113,000 persons are infected with STEC non-O157 in the US each year. These illnesses result in about 2,100 hospitalizations and 20 E. coli related deaths annually.

July 8, 2016: E. coli Sickens At Least 50 in Carbon Live Fire Mexican Grill E. coli Outbreak

Carbon Live Fire Mexican Grill Lawsuit Update

An E.coli outbreak at Carbon Live Fire Mexican Grill in Chicago sickened at least fifty patrons, hospitalizing fourteen.

FOOD POISONING LAWSUIT HELP

The Weinberg Law Firm is currently investigating cases related to the Carbon Live Fire Mexican Grill E. coli Outbreak.

The personal injury lawyers at the Weinberg Law Firm have helped food poisoning victims nationwide receive compensation for their injuries and related damages. If you or a loved one has been injured after eating a contaminated food product or restaurant meal, and you would like to know more about your legal rights, please call our lawyers at 1-877-934-6274 or fill out the Free Legal Case Evaluation form found on this page.

Carbon Live Fire Mexican Grill E. coli Outbreak

The Chicago Department of Public Health discovered the Carbon Live Fire Mexican Grill outbreak after several cases of E. coli food poisoning were traced back to the restaurant.

According to Dr. Allison Bartlett of University of Chicago Medicine, this strain of E.coli is particularly virulent. In worst-case scenarios, patients can get progressively sick and suffer from kidney failure.

Symptoms of E. coli Food Poisoning

According to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) symptoms of Shiga toxin-producing E. coli (STEC) infection include severe abdominal cramps, diarrhea, and vomiting. The diarrhea may become bloody and can lead to dehydration. There is usually little or no fever. The infection (and its symptoms) will vary from individual to individual, ranging from a mild to a life-threatening illness.

Complications of E. coli Food Poisoning

HUS – Complications of STEC infection may include Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome (HUS), a serious and sometimes life-threatening medical condition that occurs in about 5%-10% of cases. HUS is characterized by anemia, low platelet count, and renal injury or failure. Blood transfusions and kidney dialysis may be required.

TTP – Thrombotic Thrombocytopenic Purpura (TTP) is characterized by anemia, low platelet count, and renal injury or failure. There may be Central Nervous System involvement and/or fever as well.

June 11, 2016: Investigation Into Pho 75 E. coli Outbreak Ongoing

Pho 75 E. Coli Outbreak

In Aurora, Colorado, an outbreak of E. coli O157 has been linked to a local Vietnamese restaurant, Pho 75. Four people have reported illness after eating at the restaurant. At this point, the Tri-County Health Department investigation into the source of the E. coli outbreak has turned to the public for information.

Health Department Askes Patrons of Pho 75 to Particpate in Pho 75 E. Coli Outbreak Survey

The health department has generated a survey directed at all people, regardless of if the individual was sickened or not, who ate at the restaurant between May 24 and June 10, 2016. The information gathered by the survey will help the heath department identify the scope and source of the Pho 75 E. coli outbreak.

Poor Inspection Report Regarding Pho 75

In the most recent inspection report of the establishment, several violations of health codes were found, including raw beef being stored inappropriately, a food worker not washing his hands, and containers of cooked blood being stored improperly, among other things.

“We’ve worked with them [Pho 75] quite a bit over the last few years, they’ve had inspections that weren’t so great,” said Brian Hlavacek with the Tri-County Health Department. The restaurant will remain closed until these violations are fixed and the source of the outbreak is identified.

Four Sickened in Pho 75 E. coli Outbreak

Of the four people who tested positive for E.coli after eating at Pho 75, and one individual was hospitalized and then admitted to ICU after doctors determined his kidneys had started to fail. Reportedly, he is recovering.

To learn about other 2016 E. coli Food Poisoning Outbreaks, visit General Mills Flour Outbreak and Alfalfa E. coli Outbreak Lawsuit.

COMPLICATIONS OF E. COLI FOOD POISONING

Complications of E. coli infection may include Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome (HUS), a serious and sometimes life-threatening medical condition that occurs in about 5%-10% of cases. HUS is characterized by anemia, low platelet count, and renal injury or failure. Blood transfusions and kidney dialysis may be required.

Obtain a Free Legal Obtain a Free Pho 75 E. coli Outbreak Case Evaluation

If you or a family member has suffered from E. coli poisoning, and you have a question about your legal rights, you can request a free case evaluation from our firm by filling out the Case Evaluation Form found on this page. You can also contact us toll free at 877-934-6274. Our phones are answered 24/7.

For more information, please visit the Weinberg Law Firm.

About E. coli

Escherichia coli or E. coli is a type of bacterium that lives in the intestines of healthy humans and animals. Some strains of E. coli are capable of producing a powerful toxin, known as Shiga toxin, and can cause severe, life-threatening illness.

Symptoms of E. coli

According to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) symptoms of Shiga toxin-producing E. coli (STEC) infection include severe abdominal cramps, diarrhea, and vomiting. The diarrhea may become bloody and can lead to dehydration. There is usually little or no fever. The infection (and its symptoms) will vary from individual to individual, ranging from a mild to a life-threatening illness.

June 3, 2016: Canadian Researchers Find Strains of Heat-Resistant E.coli

Heat-Resistant E.coli

Canadian researches at University of Alberta have found a strain of E. coli bacteria that can survive even the Canadian government’s recommended temperature for cooking meat.

This revelation came after a student of Lynn McMullen, a food biologist at University of Alberta, found E. coli in cooked beef. “So our student came back,” Professor McMullen explained, “and said ‘This one survives 70 minutes at 140 F,’ and I said, ‘Wrong, E. coli doesn’t do that. Something’s wrong.’ ”

The usual strain of E. coli will be killed when heated to 140 F in less than a minute. These heat-resistant E. coli strains survived at that temperature for more than 70 minutes.

Salt also makes E. coli bacteria heat resistant, though the reason for this phenomenon is unknown.

About E. coli

Escherichia coli or E. coli is a type of bacterium that lives in the intestines of healthy humans and animals. Some strains of E. coli are capable of producing a powerful toxin, known as Shiga toxin, and can cause severe, life-threatening illness.

Symptoms of E. coli

According to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) symptoms of Shiga toxin-producing E. coli (STEC) infection include severe abdominal cramps, diarrhea, and vomiting. The diarrhea may become bloody and can lead to dehydration. There is usually little or no fever. The infection (and its symptoms) will vary from individual to individual, ranging from a mild to a life-threatening illness.

The CDC reports that symptoms of E. coli food poisoning typically begin 3-4 days after eating a contaminated food; however, symptoms may occur anywhere from 1 to 10 days following pathogen exposure.

Obtain a Free Legal Obtain a Free E. coli Food Poisoning Lawsuit Evaluation

If you or a family member has suffered from E. coli food poisoning, and you have a question about your legal rights, you can request a free case evaluation from our firm by filling out the Case Evaluation Form found on this page. You can also contact us toll free at 877-934-6274. Our phones are answered 24/7.

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